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PBS
Feb 4, 2013 12:00am PST
us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retire
PBS
Feb 8, 2013 12:00am PST
you have joined us for conversation with jeffrey osborne, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey osborne to this program. he has just released a terrific collection of standards called "a time for love." he is also part of an all-star tour featuring peabo bryson and others, not a bad line up. how is the door going? >> it is going good. it is one of those stores that people are flocking out to sea. you. peabo and freddie with all their hits. we have to cut the showdown, is still long. [laughter] tavis: i have not seen it yet, but i am anxious to see it. what have you decided to cut your hits down to? >> i have to dig deep and go bac
PBS
Feb 26, 2013 6:30pm PST
, miller and washington. he joins us from washington, d.c. >> tom: lots going on in that building behind you, michael. great to have you back. but more bond buying. do you support that? does the economy still need it? >> the economy probably still needs something in here, tom, yes. watch what happens when bernanke pulls back. we know we'll see some head winds from sequestration, and we've got head winds from higher taxes. so, yeah, with all of the effort that the fed has made and with still close to a trillion dollars in deficit spending, we still only have 2% g.d.p. growth. >> tom: does this impact your investment strategy, your timeline knowing that the federal reserve is going to coine continued buying with both hands? >> not so much the timeline because we really try to buy things and hold them for a long time. it is really tough to judge the fundamentals because you don't know with all of this cash that is being created if you have organic cash or cash on hand to kind of fuel things. it looked like the market was going to pull back here over the past couple of days. it looked
PBS
Feb 16, 2013 12:30pm PST
and dignity it used to have. he walks down that aisle and gets slaps and high fives. they should have had beyonce doing her number midway through it. >> every other president has walked down that aisle and i don't recall you complaining about it. >> it has lost dignity. >> ike and fdr didn't look like that. >> it is an american tradition and the fact the numbers were down is partly because people don't watch television like they used to. >> eleanor, how were obama's kneels son ratings -- neilsen ratings, the second lowest since they began taking measurement in 1993. the lowest since 2000 when bill you clinton's last drew an audience of 931.5 million. >> i think neilsen should start rating some of the social media sites and look at the exchanges between people who watched it. the american people who watched that and pick up portions that have, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the country are listening for that. they are listening for all the little programs that the
PBS
Feb 11, 2013 12:00am PST
that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are calling on the president to name susan crawford as the next chair of the federal communications commission. "prospect" magazine named her one of the "top ten brains of the digital future," and susan crawford served for a time as a special assistant to president obama for science, technology and innovatio
PBS
Feb 7, 2013 6:30pm PST
, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today apple issued this statement: "apple's management team and board of directors have been in active discussions about returning additional cash to shareholders. as part of our review, we will thoroughly evaluate greenlight capital's current proposal to issue some form of preferred stock." >> susie: joining us now with more, brian white, tech analyst at topeka capital markets. so brian, a lot going on
PBS
Feb 20, 2013 12:00am PST
could join us for our conversation with lloyd price, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: so llody price was there from the very beginning of rock- and-roll. his song "lawdy miss clawdy" crashed through barriers, going to mainstream radio. he included in hits like it's a personality" and -- like "personality" and "stagger lee," and he was inducted into the hall of fame. maybe this will jog your memory. ♪ rightreat me what you are doing to made i am going to tell everybody ♪ >> now, wikipedia says you turn 80 in march, and i am looking at you, and that cannot be possible. >> do you know what? it is. tavis: [laughs] the sunday chitlins. you could not be
PBS
Feb 4, 2013 6:30pm PST
, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product stocks, worth shopping for now. one trading session after topping 14,000 the dow jones industrial average turned back, thanks to analyst downgrades of dow stocks wal-mart and chevron. the blue chips fell 129 points, the nasdaq lost 48 points, the s&p off 17.5 points. >> susie: big stock market selloffs like today's, are rough for retail investors. that's especially true because some have only recently ventured back into stocks. but how do we know if individual investors are really buying equities at all, and why do we care? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: maybe you've seen the headlines, or perhaps you've heard the banter on television. what everyone is talking about is the retail investor, and whether he or she is cozying up to stocks again? the answer depends on where you look, and who you ask. financial planner lewis altfest says phones at his firm are busy with clients interested in equities. >> the little guy is coming back into the market. the little guy has got bonds up to his eyeballs, and is starting to pee
PBS
Feb 22, 2013 12:00am PST
called "get up!," served up with the legendary stax record label. we are glad you are able to join us for our conversation with ben harper and charlie musselwhite, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ben harper has teamed up with master charlie musselwhite, for a new cd, titled "get up!," for the legendary stax label. it has been called cinematic in the storytelling, and it has his own brand of soaring harmonica, and to start, year is a collaboration of what this sounds like. ♪ believe a word you say i do not believe i don't believe a word you say i don't believe ♪ >> bringing something out that you would not otherwise have. tavis: ben, we are in ou
PBS
Feb 6, 2013 12:00am PST
the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians and what old colonists used to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets -- as superstition and black magic. i have gone to a lot of voodoo ceremonies, and they are not what the american impression is. >tavis: how wrong with you say the impression is that we have of haiti? >> i would say in many ways it is incorrect. haitians, once removed from port-au-prince, if you go to a village, these people are self- sufficient. they are poor, but they are communita
PBS
Feb 14, 2013 12:00am PST
the first family. we are glad you can join us for our conversation with josh gad, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: josh gad got a tony nomination, and he is now the star of the commonly "1600 penn," and here is a scene from "1600 penn." >> hi. what if i told you i found a way to combine one of my great passions with an employment opportunity? >> just make sure you thought it through. >> i am going off script now. you know i have got the skills. you have always said, "do what you love, and the money will follow." >> that is not the case with magic. >> what is that? i believe this is yours, sir. do you not want to ask how i did that? tavis: is the obama era at the right time -- i am n
PBS
Feb 18, 2013 6:30pm PST
charities. >> well, it's the most popular way to give. and charities can use it right away. but charities who can take stock actually really like appreciated securities because you can sell them right away and turn it into cash. >> tom: is that preferred, though, over just the cold hard cash or the credit card contribution? >> well the credit card contribution is good but the credit card company takes a few percent off the top. so if you think you're giving a hundred dollars on-line, you're really giving $97. if you're giving cash, you can give the full amount. but one of the things about appreciated securities is that donors who give appreciated securities often give larger gifts. so charity's like that and it's pretty inexpensive to sell the security. the other nice thing is the donor gets to deduct the full market value of the gift. so if you pay $10 and just a hundred you get to deduct the $100 and avoid capital gains tax. it's way more gifting of appreciated securities than i think people really know. >> tom: we heard the jingle about donating your car. how about other hard
PBS
Feb 21, 2013 12:00am PST
us. -- military events as they assimilate back into our society. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: anthony edwards currently stars in the new drama "zero hour." this is his first series since starring as martin green in the hit series, er. he is currently involved in making a documentary about the challenges faced by military vets as they integrate into society. let's take a look at a scene ."om "zero hour >> you have been acting different. please just talk to us. >> i saw something, something i cannot explain. the guy looked like you? >> he did not look like me. he looked exactly like me. >> that does not make any sense. >> there has to be a rational explanation. >> don't you want to know him? ?ho he was pronounc
PBS
Feb 15, 2013 12:00am PST
dry!." there is a u.s. tour also under way. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hungerwalmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: this month marks the 50th anniversary of the animals. eric burden's career has continued as a solo artist and with a group war. his latest album is called "til your river runs dry!" >> ♪ mother, tell your children, not to do what i have done ♪ ♪ spend your life in sheer misery, in the house of the rising sun ♪ tavis: does it feel like five decades? >> if i look at some of them. >> you did not like that suit? >> not really. thought was a time. it was so rough doing stuff like that. it was shot at 9:00 in the morning, and it was shot in a pan of vision, and why and blends, you are not ready for that kind of stuff. i was happy without son
PBS
Feb 23, 2013 1:00pm PST
for oakland, but there are lessons to be learned from other cities. he joined us from new york. william bratton, thank you so much for coming in to talk to us today. as you know, the last time america had a very serious gun control debate was in the early 1990s. of course, you were chief of police in the new york city area. and that was followed by a two decades decline in crime. i was hope we could begin by having you put that decline in crime in context. >> the investment in the '90s was 100,000 additional police were hired. additional money went into research, into prisons, into rehabilitation efforts. research was critical. there was the assault weapons ban on certain types of assault weapons. the impact of that particular piece of the legislation is still being debated. some studies indicate it had an impact. some studies indicate it did not. from my own perspective, i look at every life saved is a plus. every incident that didn't occur is a plus. it is quite clear that hundreds of thousands of individuals who did not get access to those type weapons, that clearly there wo
PBS
Feb 6, 2013 6:30pm PST
historic proportions, to the double-digit returns that stock investors grew used to in the '90s, and perhaps to some extent in the early 21st century. that we're fot going to get there simply because interest rates are so low, the return on stocks and bonds is just not of historic proportion. what we're suggesting is be more conservative. adjust your expectations to 5% to 6%, as opposed to the 9% to 10% you thought you were going to retire on. >> susie: the other thing you say is investors should start transitioning their money, to use your word, something you can sink your teeth in. i'm quoting. this is your report. put your money in gold. tell us why and how should investors do that? >> well, sinking your teeth into that gold coin, when you bite on it to make sure it is real. and other commodities is what i was talking about, and you're absolutely correct. to the extent this credit super nova, this expansion in credit, produces 2% to 3% inflation, and going into the future. then you want to own something that is protected against credit expansion, that you can't reproduce. and that
PBS
Feb 9, 2013 12:30am PST
approve the use of medical marijuana? >> the legislature knows how to say, thou shalt not ban dispensaries. they didn't say that. >> that's the question before california's highest court this week. the ruling could have a huge impact on the state's massive medical marijuana industry. >>> job growth in silicon valley is outpacing the rest of the nation. but a new report says the income gap between rich and poor is widening. leaving some minorities behind. >>> with the number of people riding bicycles rising fast, san francisco planners roll out a multimillion dollar strategy to add bike lanes, parking stations and other improvements. we'll talk with the head of the san francisco bicycle coalition. >>> plus, california takes the first step to grant special protection to the ocean's top predator. coming up next. >>> good evening, and welcome to "this week in northern california." i'm scott shafer. well, we hoped we'd be talking about this week's super bowl victory parade for the san francisco 49ers, but it didn't quite work out that way. the good news, well, we still have plenty
PBS
Feb 23, 2013 12:00am PST
its moral leadership? we are glad you could join us. the future of catholicism in america, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> with a new pope about to be chosen in rome and the church under severe criticism for its handling of sexual-abuse cases, what is the path forward for the more than 77 million american catholics? a professor of theological ethics at loyola marymount university, raised catholic, dr. gina messina-dysert. deeply engaged in the ongoing debate about the future of catholicism in america. professor, good to have you on this program. >> thank you so much. tavis: let me start with the obvious. many of us, even those of us who are not catholi
PBS
Feb 22, 2013 6:30pm PST
deadline. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. . >> chairman of macroeconomic advisers joins us tonight from st. louis. you have been looking at the sequester and fiscal cliff for man moons, joel. a pay cut for hundreds of thousands federal employees april 1. that sounds pretty substantial. is it, to the economy? >> well, first of all, it's substantial to the people affected, no question about that. in terms of its impact on the economy, we recently did a study that suggested if the sequester goes into full effect march 1, want impact will be to knock .6% off of growth this year. that is if we thought the economy was going to grow at about 2.6% without the sequester, that will be reduced to 2% with the sequester. >> tom: for this year, we're talking $85 billion potentially taken out of the growth of government spending between march 1 and the end of september and a $4 trillion budget. proportionally for median household income that's the equivalent of $1,000 out of a $50,000 income being taken out. how can that impact economy so much? >> well, it's-- it amounts to something like an 8% c
PBS
Feb 7, 2013 12:00am PST
states on the series created by shonda rhimes. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tony goldwyn is an actor who stars on "scandal." is now in its second season and airs thursday night's. >> here is what is great about having someone attempt to assassinate you. doctors are yelling, and you could die, and you suddenly stop being afraid. then when you do not die, you realize you have nothing to lose and no time to waste. this is going to happen. i am going to divorce and remain president of the united states. that is my job. do your job. work out the details. make it happen during your -- make it happen. >> you are out of your mind. a sitting president cannot divorce his wife. >> i think you are probably right about t
PBS
Feb 9, 2013 12:00am PST
had it together, you were solid? >> i am solid. >> i just want us to be friends. >> i was having sex with everybody in the office. >> everybody? how many you were there? >> don't let tiffany get you in trouble. >> i can only do if i have a partner. >> is this the girl that you wrote about? >> you wrote about me? >> we are friends. >> went live reaches out with a moment like this, it is a sin if you don't reach back. tavis: i am told you wrote this, but put it on the shelf and then obviously came back to it. that leads to the obvious question, what did "the fighter " give you that aided and abetted the success of "silver linings playbook." >> the fighter was about a family struggling to overcome and fighting each other sometimes. i went back and rewrote the script, which i had written for my son, initially. my son has a mood disorder. that is why five years ago by raft the book because i thought this is something that could make him -- i wanted a story that would make him feel like he is part of the world, not like he is separate. i wanted to feel that he could be the story. he loves
PBS
Feb 28, 2013 12:00am PST
glad you could join us. our conversation with george wallace starts right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. if -- thank you. tavis: i am pleased to welcome george wallace back to the program. i am laughing already. after decades of making us laugh, he is now the recipient of a new lifetime award from bt. he is also celebrating his 10th year at the flamingo hotel. we will stop right there. this is my 10th year on pbs. do you see that sign, tavis 10? >> of, my goodness. tavis: he is now 10 years at the flamingo hotel, now the longest running performer to do that of african descent. a show i never miss when i am in las vegas. the celebration is this saturday, so let's take a look. >> s
PBS
Feb 27, 2013 6:30pm PST
c.e.o. tim cook sheds little light on how the company plans to use its hoard of cash. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! for the second day in a row, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told congress the central bank is not about to change its strategy, and for a second day, a strong rally on wall street. the dow surged 175 points to a five year high, the nasdaq added 32, the s&p was up 19 points. investors and traders warmed to the federal reserve chairman's steadfast support of the central bank's bond buying spree, he thinks the asset purchases are necessary to keep interest rates low in order to spur growth and boost hiring. the fed has been buying $85 billion a month in american i.o.u.'s since last september. while it won't stop the strategy, it will soon start talking about how to stop. >> we haven't done a new review of the exit strategy yet. i think we will have to do that sometime soon. even if we don't sell any securities, it doesn't mean that our balance sheet is going to be large for many years, it just would be maybe an extra year, that's all it would take to get down
PBS
Feb 25, 2013 6:30pm PST
vanderbilt, bring us vast knowledge about business issues. and you can read in-depth articles at: www.nbr.com, just look for the "nbr-u" tab. tonight, the bond market rally has lasted for a generation. with interest rates at historic lows, there is concern rates have only one direction to go, and that will push bond prices down. i spoke with franklin allen, professor at the wharton school, and began by asking whether he thinks the 30 year bull run in bond prices, is coming to an end. ask. >> it may do but i woon be sur prised if it went on for a little bit longer. >> when it does end will it be with a whimper or with more of a bang? >> it depends very much what happens between the president and congress in the negotiations about the budget deficit this year, i think. >> we certainly saw in 1994 the last time we had a really big move in a very fast move in interest rates, they moved higher pretty quickly. could we see the same thing if there is no long-term resolution? >> i think it is unlikely that we'll see a very fast move if there's no long-term resolution immediately because
PBS
Feb 1, 2013 11:05pm PST
that justice backed off. >> did the government fail? >> a number of people told us that you didn't make this a top priority. >> well, i'm sorry that they think that because i made it an incredibly top priority. >> that's lanny breuer, the assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division at the justice department. a week after the frontline report, he stepped down and is now expected to return to private corporate practice, one more government appointee spinning through the lucrative revolving door between washington and wall street. that door could be a big reason why government treats the banks with kid gloves. a man who once worked for citigroup, jack lew, the president's chief of staff, has been picked to be the new treasury secretary. and mary jo white, the newly named head of the securities and exchange commission, is a chief litigator at a top law firm representing big investment banks like morgan stanley. with all this happening, it's time to talk with journalist matt taibbi. you've seen him on our broadcast before. a contributing editor at "rolling stone," he's
PBS
Feb 8, 2013 6:30pm PST
gasoline is also on the rise. joining us now with the outlook for energy, alan harry. he's portfolio manager and c.e.o. of the spartan commodity fund. alan, let me first start off by talking to you about home heating oil. we saw prices up this week 3%. what is the trend going forward? >> well, thank you for having me. what i look at right now is short term we're going up a little bit more. longer term we're heading down. two, three weeks we're going to go up just a little bit more. after that, down we go. >> susie: why is that? >> well, i think we're coming to the close of the heating season. we already have an idea of what days we have left of heating. and it's not using up enough. so they've kept a lot in reserve, a lot of speculation coming to the market, and it's not getting used up. two, three weeks we have a great idea of where we will sit heating season wise. after that, down we go displuz for most of the u.s., households use natural gas. they don't use heating oil. and the ones that do are mostly in the northeast. so come march, will their pricees, their home bills be down? >
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 6:30pm PST
and mexican brewer modelo. using company documents to bolster their case, justice department lawyers says the deal will lead to higher prices for popular beers like budweiser and corona. anheuser-busch inbev says it is still confident the deal will go through. as darren gersh reports, the fight could be a sign more mergers will face a tougher time in washington. >> reporter: the justice department is not quite ready for a two-pack of brewers to control almost half the american beer market. in a statement announcing a lawsuit to block anheuser-bush inbev's $20 billion deal for mexican brewer modelo, assistant attorney general bill baer says >> if abi fully owned and controlled modelo, a.b.i. would be able to increase beer prices to american consumers. this lawsuit seeks to prevent a.b.i. from eliminating modelo as an important competitive force in the beer industry. anheuser-busch was not deterred, saying: >> we remain confident in our position, and we intend to vigorously contest the justice department's action in federal court. >> reporter: the proposed merger between the largest an
PBS
Feb 2, 2013 1:00pm PST
going to have a big repercussion here in california. can you tell us what that would be? >> of course. we're the state with the largest number of immigrants. we have 2.5 million undocumented immigrants and we've got a third of our registered voters are lawful immigrants. so any way you cut it, it's going to have a huge impact. some of the -- and there's a lot in here for everyone. employers, students who came here at a young age. they're called dreamers. agricultural workers. some of the things that people may not be aware of, in the president's proposal, lgbt families will be able to sponsor their family members. >> and that's from the president's proposal but not in the so-called gang of eight. >> it's not in the gang of eight proposal. but i think one of other issues for californians to, in terms of watching this debate and participating in it, is to understand what the road blocks are. because it's not just smooth sailing. there's a lot of concern about high fines for low-income immigrants. the requirements such as civics and english. even before you can get a green card. those ar
PBS
Feb 12, 2013 6:30pm PST
. >> reporter: with earnings season winding down, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have
PBS
Feb 1, 2013 12:00am PST
like you have been keeping something from us if this is a true story. what have we been getting all s?e other years chairma >> the first time i wanted to record our wanted to do doo- wop. i even did a doo-wop version of the mickey mouse march. >> why doo-wop? >> doo-wop nurtured me and threw me into who i am. the teacher thought i had a d d. tavis: what is it about the style that resonated in which you? >> i was not king cole, and who sam cooke. doo-wop was something that sued in may. it made everything all right. tavis: you mentioned an icon. since you mentioned him, i read somewhere where allen tried to get you to change the way you sing. whenever anyone here is your voice, all you need is one or two notes. it is the song style, the way you change the song. tell me about that experience. >> he was saying, can you sing it straight ahead--- straight? that is something that is just not there. >> when we hear you're saying in which that vibrato, that has always been there for you? >> yes. tavis: i assume you are ok with it. >> i am ok with it. he felt what i was thinking about, and he
PBS
Feb 13, 2013 6:30pm PST
, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: president obama also used last night's speech to push for an increase in cyber security. his proposal set the stage for a fresh debate on the urgency for cyber-security. the president made the case that america's power grid, financial institutions and air traffic control systems, are vulnerable to attacks. so he's calling on congress to pass legislation to give the u.s. government the capacity it needs to secure our networks. the president also issued an executive order, to create cyber security standards for u.s. businesses, and for the government to share more information about threats. but cyber security experts, say while that sounds easy, it's hard to do. >> you can't just inform one party necessarily, you might really have an obligation as a government to inform every player in a sector, and then of course that's a high bar, because you're sharing the information with a lot of people which increases the likelihood that it might get out back into the wrong hands. >> susie: beckstrom says the threat of cyber attack or manipulation to critic
PBS
Feb 19, 2013 12:00am PST
, everybody, they used to get doughnuts, and they used to put fliers at the bakery. "if anybody wants to appear in an upcoming feature film, poll the number and give us a call." 1 dick armey in the producer, were sitting in the bakery, so i decided to pull the number and go over there and cast. i went over there are, and he gave me a script. he gave the actress a script. we went back and forth with the actress, and we did it well, and i said, "see you later." i went back to the bakery. and then, michael called me back for another reading, and he said, "mr. zeitlin loved the reading." so i went back and did another reading, and i again said, "see you later." i never thought i was going to get it. i was, basically, it "see you later, michael." during that time, i had moved to my bakery to a bigger location, and they were looking for me to give me the part, but nobody knew where i've is back. -- where i was at. there is nobody who knew where mr. henry was at. tavis: the next time you move, let me know where you are going to be. if he cannot find you, there are customers who could not find y
PBS
Feb 26, 2013 12:00am PST
joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: taj mahal's eclectic career braces blues, jazz, americana. nine grammy nominations. he has been on a musical odyssey. that journey can be heard now in a new boxed set that includes 15 cds, 170 tracks. here is a small taste of this remarkable compilation. >> ♪ if i ever get out of this prison, i am going to do just like i please ♪ ♪ i am going to take off running to the nearest stretch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to keep running, running, running through the years bunch of trees -- the nearest bunch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to be running through these trees ♪ ♪daddy going to be running so fast it looks like daddy been running o
PBS
Feb 14, 2013 6:30pm PST
agriculture, it's far from it. >> so with these direct payment cuts it to farmers are accepted and used to avoid the sequester, does that mean that farmers have given at the office and they're to the going to have further budget cuts in other budget deals? >> yes, yeah, one of the things that i have insisted on is that this counts as the full cut for agriculture under the sequester. it's only fair. >> so one of the things that is in this package that some democrat -- democrats are asking is ending the tax break for companies that ship jobs overseas. when you look at the proposal, it's $20 million a year. now we hear this proposal a lot, ending tack breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas. but at $20 million a year isn't it just symbolic? >> this is my bring jobs home act. it's a very important principles. there are more loopholes that we need to close, no question. but step one is saying you want to move, we're not paying for your moving expenses, you're on your own. >> we're only a few weeks away from the sequester taking effect. and senate democrats are proposing things that repu
PBS
Feb 16, 2013 12:00am PST
appearance on the hbo series, "enlightened." the show is in its second season. we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day we know that we are only halfwaywalmart committed $2 billion toas we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: please welcome laura dern by on this program. the oscar nominees is enjoying great success on her series called "enlightened." here is a scene from "enlightened." >> where have you been for two days a? >> i was in lna. >> and? >> i do not want to talk to you about this kind of stuff. it would be great if you were happy for me, but it never works out that way. >> happy for what now? >> things are going to change for the better, so when the time is right. >> you have a new boyfriend or what? >> it is more than that. the bigger liar if i dream about. the happy, mom. that is all i need from you. tavis: all right, then. how cool is that? >> it was cool getting to work wi
PBS
Feb 2, 2013 12:30pm PST
period of growth at about 2% or something like that. the old die namism we used to get it is not coming back. >> the fed is $85 billion a month, 3 trillion added in,. >> reading that in. >> five straight trillion dollar deficits and we are at 2%. >> you are plunging me into deeper depression. >> i have a lot more confidence in american ingenuity. before the internet came on the scene, pat had gloom and doom then. something will happen. >> what do you think and why? >> we are sort of keeping toward a decline as pat was saying. we are not in a double dip recession. but we are so vulnerable it would only take one big event to knock us into that. the real unemployment rate supposedly around 11% if you use people who need a job not just those participate. >> real number. >>> where is consumer confidence? >> it has dropped and one of the reasons is there has been a huge evaporation of wealth for the average american family. their single largest asset was their home equity. that is down 40 to 50%. a lot of people are being let out. no increases in wages. >> payroll taxes have gone up. >> have
PBS
Feb 27, 2013 12:00am PST
-democracy, with a new book. we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with former san francisco mayor gavin newsom, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: i am sure none of us has to be reminded just how much twitter, facebook, and instagram an old email as transform our lives. in a new text called "citizenville," gavin newsom looks at how it can help break through gridlock and ensure that everyone in this country as a seat at the decision making. good to have you on. >> thanks. tavis: first of all, congratulations on your wife's recent spirit award. >> yes, she just one of the spirit award, and then they are nominated for their documentary called "the invisible war," which is abou
PBS
Feb 5, 2013 6:30pm PST
from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but the question is, what's from here? where do you go? do you move just into software and services and try to get those higher margin sales? or do you try to continue to be both players? where do you go? >
PBS
Feb 12, 2013 12:00am PST
wwill interested in foreign affairs if it affects us, is just human nature. tavis: an issue that americans seem to care about, and get your take on that. women in combat. >> that was one of the first stories i ever covered in the pentagon. it was female aviators? i did a story this year on a female fighter pilot, the first female fighter pilot in the air force that is now the first female fighter wing commander. i flew with her in her f-15 and to see her go through this, opening it to ground combat is stunning. i was just stunned when secretary panetta said the joint chiefs supported that. i think it is a challenge going forward and the military has to take this slow and they will take it slow. i don't think they can lower physical standards or you end up with problems. what people don't understand is part of the reason having women in combat is so important to females, having the opportunity is leadership positions. you have seen amazing women over the years. and have been awarded silver stars because they are in the middle of a fire fight. this is a great opportunity going forw
PBS
Feb 13, 2013 12:00am PST
, tenures ago, revealed herself to be the secret daughter of strom thurmond, news she shared with us when we were first on the air, as we celebrate now 10 years on this network. this is coming up, right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: mark pinksy is the president and ceo of a nonprofit designed to align money and capital with political, economic, and social justice, opportunity finance network. ofm, and i am sure we will get to that. good to have you on the program. >> good to be here. tavis: i am not the only one continuing to do as much as we can on the issue of poverty, and this includes so much. what often does not get talked about is the fight back. i do not want to
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